Levothyroxine Side Effects

Thyroid medication remains the go to treatment for the masses who suffer from hypothyroidism. This is no new news but the side effects caused by them may be.  I raise my hand to this fact and admittedly never paid attention to the serious side effect they cause.

Now in one of my previous post, I shed light on my thyroid medication Synthroid (You can read the post Synthroid Side Effects). Well, I continue down this rabbit hole with Levothyroxine side effects.  The results are not pretty.  But, honestly after my awakening to Synthroid side effects, I am not surprised.  Here again is the laundry list of levothyroxine side effects.   I found these conveniently from the drugs.com website https://www.drugs.com/sfx/levothyroxine-side-effects.html

  • Chest pain or discomfort
  • decreased urine output
  • difficult or labored breathing
  • difficulty with swallowing
  • dilated neck veins
  • extreme fatigue
  • fainting
  • fast, slow, irregular, pounding, or racing heartbeat or pulse
  • fever
  • heat intolerance
  • hives or welts
  • increased blood pressure
  • increased pulse
  • irregular breathing
  • irritability
  • menstrual changes
  • nausea
  • pain or discomfort in the arms, jaw, back, or neck
  • shortness of breath
  • skin itching, rash, or redness
  • sweating
  • swelling of the eyes, face, lips, throat, or tongue
  • tightness in the chest
  • tremors
  • troubled breathing
  • Blurred or double vision
  • dizziness
  • eye pain
  • lack or slowing of normal growth in children
  • limp or walk favoring one leg
  • pain in the hip or knee
  • seizures
  • severe headache
  • Change in consciousness
  • cold, clammy skin
  • confusion
  • disorientation
  • fast or weak pulse
  • lightheadedness
  • loss of consciousness
  • sudden headache
  • sudden loss of coordination
  • sudden slurring of speech
  • Abdominal or stomach cramps
  • change in appetite
  • crying
  • diarrhea
  • false or unusual sense of well-being
  • fear
  • feeling not well or unhappy
  • feeling of discomfort
  • feeling of warmth
  • feeling things are not real
  • feelings of suspicion and distrust
  • hair loss
  • headache
  • increased appetite
  • mental depression
  • muscle weakness
  • nervousness
  • quick to react or overreact emotionally
  • rapidly changing moods
  • redness of the face, neck, arms, and occasionally, upper chest
  • restlessness
  • trouble getting pregnant
  • trouble sitting still
  • unusual tiredness or weakness
  • vomiting
  • weight gain
  • weight loss

Now to be fair, I lumped all of them together. Drugs.com has them broken out to less common, rare etc. I am less political, and my goal is to bring awareness.  I created this blog to share my findings and candidly admit to my struggle with hypothyroidism. If you are taking Levothyroxine, you should at the very least know the levothyroxine side effects.

Related Post: Side Effects of Synthroid

What Is A Thyroid Nodule?

Another term popped up on my quest to reverse hypothyroidism: Thyroid Nodule.     More specifically, what is a thyroid nodule?  At first glance the term looks something a kid would use in a game of pretend. A thyroid nodule is nothing to pretend. In fact I came to find out its meaning is quite significant.

So for those who are like myself unaware of its meaning this post may provide some insight.  So, what is a thyroid nodule?  The mayoclinic.org and endocrineweb.com both have similar takes on the term.  They both say they are lumps.  What is interesting is they can arrive from an otherwise normal thyroid gland.  In many cases you cannot detect them on your own.

You are most likely to find out about them upon a regular routine to your doctor.  He or she will have discovered you have a thyroid nodule during that time.  Now there are some who will have a thyroid nodule that will grow large in size.  For those individuals it may make it difficult to swallow or breathe.  Here is some facts that I found from endocrine web regarding thyroid nodules

  1. Young women 1 out of 12 to 15 women has a thyroid nodule
  2. More than 95% of all thyroid nodules are benign(no reason for concern)
  3. Some thyroid nodules are cysts instead of thyroid tissue.
  4. Most people will develop a thyroid nodule by the time they are 50 years old.
  5. Most thyroid nodules cause no symptoms at all.
  6. The incidence of thyroid nodules increase with age.

There is more to the list of course. I just pointed out 6 that stuck out to me.  Thyroid nodules can become of concern when they can actually be felt or seen as a swelling at the base of your neck.  They also are dangerous if you have hyperthyroid instead of hypothyroidism.  Well that concludes my post today on what is a thyroid nodule.  I hope you got something out of it.  I definitely learned something writing it.

Thyroid Blood Test

Is the thyroid blood test reliable?

For any suffering from either a hyper or hypothyroid a thyroid blood test is the typical route used to check the T4 level of hormone in the blood.  The question is, is it reliable?  I stumbled an interesting article that brings this very question in to the spotlight.  Ironically it comes from an article that’s title would suggest very little to do with a thyroid blood test. Doctors Diary: We need more realistic end of life expectations”    After reading the beginning paragraphs which coincide with the topic title it breaks into an entirely different discussion on thyroid dysfunction.    Apparently there has been much confusion on the reliability of the thyroid blood test.  I am putting it mildly here. Look at a couple of quotes from the article1

So far, so straightforward – except that over the years, some doctors, and certainly their patients, have disputed the reliability of these tests in distinguishing between those who do and do not have hypothyroidism. In 1997, a group of family doctors noted that they were abnormal in just nine out of 80 patients with obvious clinical signs of hypothyroidism, prompting reports of a dramatic response to thyroxine replacement in those with “normal” blood tests. “My physician decided a trial of thyroxine would be harmless,” wrote a woman with a full-house of symptoms that promptly resolved on a dose of just 25mcg daily.”

Huh, that’s interesting. Here is another telling quote from the article …

“The issue is compounded by the claims of many with hypothyroidism that the blood tests monitoring their treatment are an inadequate guide to the dose they should be taking”

Clearly there is an issue here. And warrants the caution I have now on just taking the doctor’s word for (See my previous post on Synthroid Side Effects) it.  My husband is more cynical and this article gives him more ammunition. He tends to have a general distrust of the official medical community.  I am starting to see his point.

I will leave with this a quote that I heard. I believe was stated by Ronald Reagan.  “Trust, but verify”.  I believe this quote could be used for the actually effectiveness of the thyroid blood test.  As always  ladies strive to get off medications….

Side Effects of Synthroid

I am not a cynic by nature and I tend to see the good in everything.  I generally believe most doctors are for the patient, and have their best interest in heart.  Why am I stating this in a start of a blog post?  Great question. After reading the side effects of synthroid, I am challenged to reevaluate the beliefs I hold as truth.

As many of you know I have been taking synthroid for the last 20 years, at least.  My dosage has been changed and monitored, but I have never had reason to believe I could be rid of this medication until I started this blog/website.  If there was ever a reason to strive to get off meds, the side effects of synthroid are reasons in itself.

Before laying out the long list of side effects I want to lay the ground work for today’s discussion.  The best way to do this is providing direct language from the official synthroid website(https://www.synthroid.com/what-is-synthroid/side-effects?cid=ppc_ppd_ggl_synth_br_2015_side_effects_of_synthroid_Exact_6051766802).  I first begin with the quote on its use: “SYNTHROID® is a prescription, man-made thyroid hormone that is used to treat a condition called hypothyroidism, except in cases of temporary hypothyroidism, which is usually associated with an inflammation of the thyroid gland (thyroiditis). It is meant to replace a hormone that is usually made by your thyroid gland. Generally, thyroid replacement treatment is to be taken for life.”

Okay nothing earth shattering in that!  But take a look at two more quotes I found with just a slight scroll with my mouse …

  • Do not use SYNTHROID if you have hyperthyroidism or over-active thyroid, uncorrected adrenal problems, are having symptoms of a heart attack, or are allergic to any of its ingredients.
  • In women, long-term treatment with SYNTHROID has been associated with increased bone loss, especially in women who are on high doses or those who are on high doses after menopause.

What?!?!  The main drug that I have prescribed is clearly stating not to take it for the condition I have been diagnosed to have!  Am I misreading something!  I can’t imagine that! But what’s also most disheartening is my physician mentioned nothing at all of this development.  I did this post not just for me, but the 100,000 + women out there as well who are taking synthroid to treat their thyroid issues.    If that was not news in itself, let me lay out the side effects of synthroid

  • Chest pain or discomfort
  • decreased urine output
  • difficult or labored breathing
  • difficulty with swallowing
  • dilated neck veins
  • extreme fatigue
  • fainting
  • fast, slow, irregular, pounding, or racing heartbeat or pulse
  • fever
  • heat intolerance
  • hives or welts
  • increased blood pressure
  • increased pulse
  • irregular breathing
  • irritability
  • menstrual changes
  • nausea
  • pain or discomfort in the arms, jaw, back, or neck
  • shortness of breath
  • skin itching, rash, or redness
  • sweating
  • swelling of the eyes, face, lips, throat, or tongue
  • tightness in the chest
  • tremors
  • troubled breathing

 

  • Blurred or double vision
  • dizziness
  • eye pain
  • lack or slowing of normal growth in children
  • limp or walk favoring one leg
  • pain in the hip or knee
  • seizures
  • severe headache
  • Change in consciousness
  • cold, clammy skin
  • confusion
  • disorientation
  • fast or weak pulse
  • lightheadedness
  • loss of consciousness
  • sudden headache
  • sudden loss of coordination
  • sudden slurring of speech
  • Abdominal or stomach cramps
  • change in appetite
  • crying
  • diarrhea
  • false or unusual sense of well-being
  • fear
  • feeling not well or unhappy
  • feeling of discomfort
  • feeling of warmth
  • feeling things are not real
  • feelings of suspicion and distrust
  • hair loss
  • headache
  • increased appetite
  • mental depression
  • muscle weakness
  • nervousness
  • quick to react or overreact emotionally
  • rapidly changing moods
  • redness of the face, neck, arms, and occasionally, upper chest
  • restlessness
  • trouble getting pregnant
  • trouble sitting still
  • unusual tiredness or weakness
  • vomiting
  • weight gain
  • weight loss

It is interesting, I have laid out several past posts on Hypothyroid Symptoms and a number of these side effects are on the list.  Now I am a realist who hates change so in no way am I suggesting getting off of synthroid medication immediately.  My point is to bring attention and awareness.  The side effects of synthroid are grounds for change, in which I am actively trying. It’s a journey.  I make another reference to Hypothyroidism Revolution as the pathway for the change. Hypothyroidism and Diabetes

It’s completely risk free and offers a 60 day money back guarantee.  Here is a link to a couple of reviews on the product. …

http://www.hypothyroidismnaturaltreatments.com/tom-brimeyer-hypothyroidism-revolution-review/

http://steamspoils.com/hypothyroidism-revolution-review

http://www.sparkpeople.com/myspark/team_messageboard_thread.asp?board=21504x732x50310616

Primary Hypothyroidism and Secondary Hypothyroidism, Huh?

Primary Hypothyroidism and Secondary Hypothyroidism. Did you know there were two types?

It seems like every other day I learn something new about thyroid disease. Today’s post brings light to something I was completely in the dark about: Primary Hypothyroidism and Secondary Hypothyroidism.  Did you know there was two, and they are both different?  Maybe you did, but I had no clue until I came across this article: “Primary Hypothyroidism and Secondary Hypothyroidism and their Differences”.  The title caught my attention, so of course I had to read it. And low and behold there is definitely two distinct forms of hypothyroidism.  Not only are there two, but the differences are striking as well.

In Primary hypothyroidism the problem stems from the thyroid itself. Low levels of hormones and slowed metabolism.  Secondary hypothyroidism is completely different, as the thyroid gland functions well, but the pituitary gland doesn’t stimulate the thyroid to produce hormones.  I did not know that until now!  Something else interesting: the hypothalamus in the brain is also part of the problem in causing secondary hypothyroidism. Another tidbit I found out from the article.  I also found out that in secondary hypothyroidism will have other effects on the body including dry skin, dry hair, low blood sugar also known as hypoglycemia and skin depigmentation.

For the majority of us who have primary hypothyroidism, Hashimoto’s disease is often found to be a culprit.  Secondary hypothyroidism does not fall under the same treatment options.  With secondary hypothyroidism, treatment has to be done more carefully since other organs of the body are at risk.  Check out the article(http://www.newsmax.com/FastFeatures/primary-hypothyroidism-secondary-hypothyroidism-differences/2016/06/17/id/734441/), it’s worth the 5-7 minute read.

For those who did not know there are two forms of hypothyroidism Primary Hypothyroidism and Secondary Hypothyroidism. I hope this has been informative at the very least.  Until the next post, strive to get off meds and keep getting educated.

Related Posts: What is Hypothyroidism, What Causes Hypothyroidism

Review of The Yoga Burn for 2016

Attention: Ladies I found a Yoga Program Strictly for Us!

Exercise is pivotal for the human body, we all know this.  That is why I have dedicated a number of posts on hypothyroidism exercise throughout this blog.  As many of you know, I have been suffering from hypothyroidism for years. Exercise and weight reduction are so hard once you have kids, and when you are not in your early 20’s anymore. You compile that with having a hypothyroid, you literally feel defeated. To make matters worse, I found out the exercise I used to do was not effective for a person with hypothyroidism. Where am I going with this?

Once I found out what exercises I was doing that were wrong for me, I have been searching for an exercise program that’s right. Well, that is right for me and effective with my hypothyroidism. But not just one of the approved exercise programs (see my post on hypothyroid exercise), but one that caters and understands women.

Well ladies, I believe that my search may be over. Yes, over with Yoga Burn. Yoga Burn is groundbreaking. It is designed by a women and catered to women. The creator, Zoe Bray-Cotton is no slouch ladies. Unlike someone who may have no credentials at a gym teaching Yoga; she is a certified yoga instructor, certified personal trainer, and female fitness expert.  To add more to her credibility, she has taught all major forms and styles of Yoga for over 10 years in some big name studios and major well known gyms.

>> GET INFORMATION ON THE OFFICIAL YOGA BURN WEBSITE, RISK FREE, RIGHT HERE >>>

Ladies, finally someone who understands us.  Let’s face it, most exercise programs are typically designed by men. I cannot tell you how many classes I have been to where sometimes I think how I am going to do this next move. Zoe’s Yoga Burn is phenomenally different.  It focuses on a term called Dynamic Sequencing.

The concept in a nutshell shows you how to perform each movement, and then continues to adapt and increase each challenge at the moment you get used to it. But if you’re worried it will be too hard, start as a beginner, it caters to you. The great thing is, Yoga Burn is fully laid out in a way that keeps your mind and body questioning, so you don’t get bored or reach a plateau.

What if you don’t find it to work for you?

This is a legitimate concern, and something Zoe addresses from the starting gate.  For any reason, if you are not completely satisfied with the program, you can call the toll free number within 60 days of your purchase. You will be issued a 100% guarantee refund within 48 hours. For the physical version of this program, you can return the product anytime. You will receive a no question asked refund.

Oh yeah, I forgot to mention you have the option for the Completely Green Version, which is a digital download. The digital download and the physical connection, or the digital download plus 2 physical connection DVDs.  Its great having a physical copy for those of us who like the idea of something we can put our hands on. I like the bigger screen at times, instead of always viewing my cell phone or tablet.

So, there you have it, no risk, full money back 60 day guarantee. No questions asked. It is one of the approved exercise forms for hypothyroidism, and it’s for us ladies. You’ve got to check it out.

>>> GET INFORMATION ON THE OFFICIAL YOGA BURN WEBSITE, RISK FREE, RIGHT HERE >>>

5 Signs of Thyroid Cancer, Taken For Granted

Nobody ever wants to get the news that they have cancer. It’s not only unsettling, but the end result could lead to death.  Like many before getting educated, I had no idea of how important the thyroid gland plays in regulating everything in your body.  Today’s post takes on more of a serious warning tone in nature as I discuss thyroid cancer.

Cancer runs in my family. My aunt died of it when I was young. So when finding out the signs of thyroid cancer, I knew I had to bring attention to it in my blog.  In fact, the 5 signs of thyroid cancer that I am going to mention, many will brush off.  I know this, because when reading them myself, I would have never guessed that they were actually signs of thyroid cancer.

Let’s begin to show you what I mean:

  • A constant cough that is not due to a cold. Since I suffer from allergies, coughing during the allergy season is not uncommon, but I would never have guessed a constant cough could be a sign of thyroid cancer.
  • Trouble swallowing. Again, something anybody would brush off as happenstance or no big deal
  • Hoarseness or other voice changes that do not go away. Whoa! Again an eye opener for me, and one sign I would have never had on my radar.
  • Trouble breathing. Now I would contributed this symptom due to something else but not in the foggiest would I have thought it would be a sign of thyroid cancer.
  • Pain in the front of the neck, sometime going up to the ears. Okay, this again totally unexpected and really caught me by surprise.

If you experience a combination of these things please seek a medical opinion.  These signs of thyroid cancer, anyone may shrug off and take for granted. I did, don’t let that be you.

Hypothyroidism in Women

Hypothyroidism in women- World Thyroid Day

In today’s post I put specific emphasis on hypothyroidism in women.  Now as my husband points out, there are men who suffer from this disease as well, but ladies dominate this space.  This is not a good thing! The inspiration for this post stemmed from an article I read entitled “World Thyroid Day”.  It seems May 25th is a day dedicated to thyroid health internationally.  What drew my attention was the emphasis it placed on hypothyroidism in women.  Although none of the information was shocking for any of us who suffer from hypothyroidism.  I did find some of the statistics interesting.  For one “6.5 percent of the global population suffers from some form of hypothyroidism”.  That’s over 400 million worldwide who suffer from an unhealthy thyroid.  This is if you use 7.125 billion as the benchmark for the world population. 

My math could be dicey here, but that is still nearly a half a billion. It gets worse. Out of the 400 million worldwide, hypothyroidism in women is most common with up to 15 percent being obese, suffering from water retention, fatigue, skin dryness, and constipation.  This does not come from me, but from the doctor in the article.  Ladies we have our work cut out for us.  On a more uplifting note, I am glad that a spotlight has been placed on the thyroid gland, and hypothyroidism.

At the same time, I am deeply disturbed at the growing number of women worldwide suffering from the effects of thyroid issues.  To give you an example, Thyroid disease is common, and is spreading in the population of India, particularly in pregnant women.  Of the many hypothyroidism symptoms mentioned, miscarriage and infertility was discussed.  As a mother with two girls, this really saddens my heart.

Related Posts: Hypothyroid Symptoms, Hypothyroidism Symptoms, What is Hypothyroidism

Diet for Hypothyroidism

6 Foods Needed for a Thyroid Diet

You are what you eat! Whoever invented that phrase is a genius.  Diet is pivotal in creating lasting, changing and reversing hypothyroidism.  That’s why this post is dedicated to what a proper diet for hypothyroidism should entail.  In fact, I am going to give you 6 foods needed, for let say a thyroid diet.  Each one has their merits and are essential components for a balanced diet for hypothyroidism. 

So let’s begin:

  1. Coffee Diet For Hypothyroidism

I wrote about Coffee before in a previous post (coffee can save your life).  Its benefits are definitely worth repeating.  Coffee is fantastic FOR A THYROID DIET. If you don’t drink it on an empty stomach and you properly eat the right ratios of fat and sugar.  Coffee is packed with high concentrations of magnesium and large amounts of B vitamins.  Both of these elements are necessary for proper thyroid function.  Studies also show that coffee drinkers have the lowest incidence of cancer and thyroid disease.  So have a cup or three.

 

  1. Fruit Diet For Hypothyroidism

You can never go wrong eating fruit and it’s a girl or gals best friend on a diet for hypothyroidism.  Apples, Oranges and Bananas are some great fruits that come to mind. There is the exception of avocado, most fruits are high in potassium which plays a pivotal role in regulating your blood sugar.  The potassium in fruit helps to decrease the need for insulin which keeps your blood sugar levels stable for longer periods of time.  So definitely eat your fruit.

 

  1. Have Some Salt Diet For Hypothyroidism

Sounds weird, huh?  Believe me I know, there is a lot of information out there against salt and sodium.  Some is true, but a lot of the information are myths.  For instance the myths never address the fact that sodium is actually an important nutrient to carry out a multitude of functions. On top of the list is properly regulating blood pressure. You may not know this, but one of the more common hypothyroidism symptoms is edema.  Edema is a condition which your cells take up too much water.  As the cells take up water, they lose sodium which is then lost when you go to the bathroom and urinate.

This leads to low sodium levels which actually slows your metabolism.  We all know what a slow metabolism does. It causes you to get fat!  Lack of sodium also increases your stress hormones and leads to sleep problems.  So you need salt in order to get sodium.  And as shown in the above sentences, Sodium is necessary. So increase your salt intake, but do it responsibly.

 

  1. Have Some Bone Broth Diet For Hypothyroidism

What the heck is bone broth?  My thoughts exactly! But let me tell you I have done some research and it is one of the best sources of protein you can muster.  In fact, it was a common part of a large number of diets over a 100 years ago.  It’s nearly forgotten, but is excellent for a hypothyroidism diet.  From the research I have done, bone broth is packed with nutrients, anti-inflammatory amino acids, and easy to digest.  Full disclosure, I have not tried it yet.

 

  1. Eat Crabs, Lobster and Shrimp Diet for Hypothyroidism

Shell fish is one of my favorite foods to eat, particularly Lobster.  I love lobster, and I was so happy to hear how beneficial shellfish are good for your thyroid.  Shellfish is a huge source to the thyroid hormone, which is rarely gotten in a standard meat diet.  Shell fish is high in selenium, and one of the key ingredients to getting inactive T4 hormones to become active. T3 thyroid hormones in your liver.  I should have listed it as number 1, because of its importance in a diet for hypothyroidism.

 

  1. Drink Less Water Diet For Hypothyroidism

What?  I know this one sounds crazy, but for hypothyroidism suffers, the standard 8 glasses of water a day is actually counterproductive.  Unless you’re out all day in the heat, or work in the sun you don’t need as much water. Your body already retains it.  It’s no secret that water retention is a common problem for individuals with thyroid deficiency.  I already mentioned the loss of sodium in the previous paragraphs. And that’s what you are doing when you drink that much water.  A simple rule of thumb, drink when you are thirsty.  This is the best thing when it comes to the water debate.

 

Related Posts: Hypothyroidism Diet, Hypothyroid Diet, News Update Coffee, Cooking With Coconut Oil

Hypothyroidism and Diabetes

Can Hypothyroidism now cause diabetes?

If having thyroid issues was enough to deal with, I just read an article on Hypothyroidism and Diabetes.  It seems a low thyroid may be a risk factor for type 2 diabetes.  I have enclosed the article here.  As you can guess, this is the last thing I wanted to read.  The researcher in the article, Dr. Layal Chaker stated and I quote that a “Low thyroid function is associated with a higher risk of developing diabetes and also of progression from prediabetes to diabetes.”  The study included 8,452 individuals over the age of 45 with thyroid dysfunctions, and no case of diabetes.  After following up nearly 8 years later, 1,100 of the individuals in the survey were pre-diabetic and 798 of the individuals developed diabetes.

This has me concerned for many reasons, one of which is my husband’s family has a history of diabetics and I struggle with weight as an effect due to my hypothyroidism.  So now a link of hypothyroidism and diabetes is a double conundrum of crap to deal with.  Thankfully I am working on it.  The article goes on and shows the staggering numbers of diabetics out there.  Here is some figures from the article given by the CDC.  They estimate that in America alone there are 29.1 million Americans have diabetes of which 8.1 million cases are undiagnosed.  This is at epidemic levels and really not given the attention it should.  “But here’s the kicker, thyroid disorders affect nearly as many Americans as diabetes, roughly 27 million”.

So how does hypothyroidism and diabetes find common route?

Well it affects in several ways.  The first way is that both diabetes and thyroid disorder affect the hormones that are used for bodily functions.  Insulin issues are found in diabetics and the thyroid is responsible for the metabolism.  Anyone with weight issues surely know a great deal about metabolism.   The apparent relationship with thyroid disease and diabetes is still under study, so it can be fully understood.  One of the thyroids function is controlling sugar levels.  Glucose sugar levels are truly problematic for diabetics, making it difficult to manage.

The article is fantastic, and I encourage you to read it (http://www.belmarrahealth.com/type-2-diabetes-risk-linked-to-low-thyroid-function-new-study-suggests/). One of the many impressive things is there list of tips to manage thyroid disorders.  Although on top of the list was hormone replacement medications they did mention one tip for a hypothyroidism, diet. A diet that showed major promise.  The article stated to eliminate soy and gluten from your diet.  The mention of the elimination of soy is huge and that has to be commended.  Read the article! The link between hypothyroidism and diabetes is a real concern, and one that should not be taken lightly.

I leave you with a resource to consider.  Really look into the Hypothyroidism Revolution. If you have hypothyroidism, and are really looking how to reverse the effects naturally, you cannot find anything else out there to match the quality of this product.  The product is risk free and it is monumental in the path of reversing hypothyroidism. Just click the Hypothyroidism and Diabetes image to go to the official site for more information.